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Denied SS Benefits For Earning Too Much Income? Here’s What You’ll Need To Know

There are plenty of reasons why you may be denied your Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. Having too much income is one of the most common reasons you could be denied benefits. To understand why, it’s important to know what the income limits are and how certain activities could count against you when assessing your benefit eligibility. Understanding SGA The Social Security Administration (SSA) usually determines SSDI and SSI eligibility according to an applicant’s ability to earn a living by performing significant physical or mental activities, also known as “substantial gainful activity” (SGA). If you’re disabled and applying for benefits, the amount of money you’re able to earn could count against the SGA threshold set by the SSA. For 2016, the thresholds are $1,130 per month for non-blind recipients and $1,820 for blind recipients. In order to qualify for benefits, your medical condition must be serious enough that it keeps you from making a significant living throughout the year. Earning wages beyond the set thresholds for SGA could put your benefits in jeopardy as your earning activity indicates an ability to work normally in spite of your condition, even if you work part-time or make substantially less than before you were disabled. Voluntary Work Could Also Count Against You Even unpaid activities such as volunteer work could be considered SGA, as these activities demonstrate that you’re able to work at the SGA level. If you pitch in at a local charity or animal shelter for a few hours a week, volunteer at a business owned by a family member or volunteer in a position where wages would be above the SGA level if it was a paid position, the SSA could deny your SSDI or SSI benefits based on this demonstration of your work abilities. The only exceptions to this rule are voluntary activities covered by the Domestic Volunteer Service Act of 1973 and the Small Business Act. Performing work for programs such as Volunteers in Service to America and Active Corps of Executives won’t count against you when it comes to applying for your SSDI or SSI benefits. Exceptions to the Rule Not every activity falls under the SGA rule when it comes to initial eligibility. For instance, the everyday activities you perform to take care of yourself aren’t counted as SGA. Ordinary household chores aren’t counted and your normal social activities won’t be counted as well. You also won’t have to worry about running afoul of SGA levels when undergoing physical, mental or occupational therapy. While these activities won’t affect your initial eligibility, they may play a small role in the SSA deciding whether to continue...

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Three Types Of Videos That May Be Beneficial In Your Personal Injury Case

There is an old saying that a picture is worth a thousand words. If this is the case, then a video can be worth even more. This could be especially true if you have incurred a personal injury due to the negligence of others. There are several different types of videos that may be beneficial to your personal injury case. Knowing the difference in these videos, as well as their pros and cons, is the first step to deciding if a video will play a starring role in your case. Accident Reconstruction Video When an accident occurs, it is not uncommon for one driver to tell one version of how the accident happened and the other driver to tell another. This makes it difficult to tell exactly how an accident occurred, which can make it difficult to determine who is at fault. An accident reconstruction video can help to demonstrate how the accident unfolded, as well as the conditions when the accident occurred. Not only can these types of videos be powerful visual aids to accompany the testimony of your expert witnesses, but they can make your accident clearer for the judge and jury. “Day In The Life” Videos A good personal injury attorney is often a good storyteller. They are able to use words in a way that will allow them to paint a picture for the jury they are in front of. No matter how good a storyteller they are, however, there are still going to be people who will have difficulty visualizing exactly what is being described. When your attorney is able to provide a “Day in the Life” video to the jury, they may have a better understanding how your injury has affected you and your family. This type of video will allow the jury to see and experience your difficulties from your perspective or the perspective of the one providing your care. This will have more impact than a written or verbal description of your injuries. Some of the things that they may want to showcase may include: Any medical services or therapy that you are engaged in Any activities of daily living you are having difficulty with Family activities you may no longer be able to participate in and more Clips of your day in the life of video may be used to help enhance your personal testimony, as well as the testimony of your spouse, your doctors, or any other expert witnesses the attorney is planning to use. Some attorneys have found that by spacing your day in the life of video throughout these various testimonies, instead of having one continuous viewing, has resulted in better juror attentiveness...

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